Excerpt from San Diego Union Tibune Article:

SOMETIMES IT COMPUTES Humanity's relationship with technology is explored in companion shows in Escondido

By Neil Kendricks May 30, 2002

Nature and humanity

Ironically, the viewer finds a more convincing argument about the ubiquitous nature of technology and its effects on humanity in the museum's companion show, "DV Noir: Video Art From Under the Shadow of Hollywood."Throughout this exhibition showcasing the works of contemporary Los Angeles-based video artists, the pieces are far more visually engaging.

Chris Rowland's DVD, "The First Time," unfolds as a series of fragmented shots: A woman's hands run over an automobile's smooth, polished metal, and a man's fingers toy with car keys, as a revving motor provides the soundtrack. This teasing collection of quasi-erotic images could have been equally inspired by underground filmmaker Kenneth Anger's avant-garde short films, as well as J.G. Ballard's dystopian novel "Crash." The piece also shows how cars become projections of their drivers' attitudes and, even, obsessions.

With Dane Picard's video, "Portraits, IDs and Snapshots #2," the artist uses the medium to look inward rather than at the outside world. This deceptively simple piece is made up of still photographs of the artist from childhood to adulthood. What makes this strange self-portrait resonate is the way each photo quickly morphs in the next image with an almost seamless fluidity. In a very succinct way, Picard captures both the passage of time and how a person's inner life can often be evoked in even the most banal family pictures.

While Picard zooms in on the small details of his own life, Esther Mera's multichannel video installation, "Signal to Noise," aspires to catch a glimpse of something larger and more otherworldly.

In Mera's piece, dimly lit walls become pseudo movie screens where the artist projects ambiguous images of shadowy figures strolling across grainy, black-and-white landscapes and satellites orbiting in space. The piece's spooky, dream-like atmosphere is heightened by the chirping of live crickets in screened enclosures, and a trio of empty beds arranged in various spots of the room.

In many ways, Picard and Mera are polar opposites in terms of their approaches. While neither artist is as well-known as the medium's pioneers, Nam June Paik or Bill Viola, their intriguing works in "DV Noir" suggest that they are very much in sync with our current, high-tech Zeitgeist and its possible, emotional fallout.

Neil Kendricks is a San Diego artist.

datebook

"Interface: A Juried Exhibition Exploring Art, Science and Technology" and "DV Noir: Video Art From Under the Shadow of Hollywood"

California Center for the Arts, Escondido, 340 N. Escondido Blvd. Both exhibitions run through June 29

(760) 839-4120 or www.artcenter.org

Complete Article on-line:

 

Excerpt from San Diego Union Tibune Article:

SOMETIMES IT COMPUTES Humanity's relationship with technology is explored in companion shows in Escondido

By Neil Kendricks May 30, 2002

Nature and humanity

Ironically, the viewer finds a more convincing argument about the ubiquitous nature of technology and its effects on humanity in the museum's companion show, "DV Noir: Video Art From Under the Shadow of Hollywood."Throughout this exhibition showcasing the works of contemporary Los Angeles-based video artists, the pieces are far more visually engaging.

Chris Rowland's DVD, "The First Time," unfolds as a series of fragmented shots: A woman's hands run over an automobile's smooth, polished metal, and a man's fingers toy with car keys, as a revving motor provides the soundtrack. This teasing collection of quasi-erotic images could have been equally inspired by underground filmmaker Kenneth Anger's avant-garde short films, as well as J.G. Ballard's dystopian novel "Crash." The piece also shows how cars become projections of their drivers' attitudes and, even, obsessions.

With Dane Picard's video, "Portraits, IDs and Snapshots #2," the artist uses the medium to look inward rather than at the outside world. This deceptively simple piece is made up of still photographs of the artist from childhood to adulthood. What makes this strange self-portrait resonate is the way each photo quickly morphs in the next image with an almost seamless fluidity. In a very succinct way, Picard captures both the passage of time and how a person's inner life can often be evoked in even the most banal family pictures.

While Picard zooms in on the small details of his own life, Esther Mera's multichannel video installation, "Signal to Noise," aspires to catch a glimpse of something larger and more otherworldly.

In Mera's piece, dimly lit walls become pseudo movie screens where the artist projects ambiguous images of shadowy figures strolling across grainy, black-and-white landscapes and satellites orbiting in space. The piece's spooky, dream-like atmosphere is heightened by the chirping of live crickets in screened enclosures, and a trio of empty beds arranged in various spots of the room.

In many ways, Picard and Mera are polar opposites in terms of their approaches. While neither artist is as well-known as the medium's pioneers, Nam June Paik or Bill Viola, their intriguing works in "DV Noir" suggest that they are very much in sync with our current, high-tech Zeitgeist and its possible, emotional fallout.

Neil Kendricks is a San Diego artist.

datebook

"Interface: A Juried Exhibition Exploring Art, Science and Technology" and "DV Noir: Video Art From Under the Shadow of Hollywood"

California Center for the Arts, Escondido, 340 N. Escondido Blvd. Both exhibitions run through June 29

(760) 839-4120 or www.artcenter.org

Complete Article on-line: