Tucson Weekly: Short is sweet

by Mari Wadsworth

April 6-8, 2000

Of the remaining four American shorts, only two -- Dane Picard's "Who, Me?" and Courtney Byrd's "Graham's Diner" have the feel of a Hollywood Hallmark card -- which is not intended as criticism. Rather, each embraces a slick, stylized format that's immediately familiar, while delivering a palatable punchline story that proves formulaic can still be fun.
Picard's five-minute discourse on censorship simultaneously plays with the idea of the myopic viewpoint while maximizing its melodramatic feel with high-contrast black and white, skewed angles and "revealing" closeups from its 35 mm lens. It's a film that says on multiple levels there's more to each scene than first meets the eye.

complete on-line article:

Tucson Weekly: Short is sweet

by Mari Wadsworth

April 6-8, 2000

Of the remaining four American shorts, only two -- Dane Picard's "Who, Me?" and Courtney Byrd's "Graham's Diner" have the feel of a Hollywood Hallmark card -- which is not intended as criticism. Rather, each embraces a slick, stylized format that's immediately familiar, while delivering a palatable punchline story that proves formulaic can still be fun.
Picard's five-minute discourse on censorship simultaneously plays with the idea of the myopic viewpoint while maximizing its melodramatic feel with high-contrast black and white, skewed angles and "revealing" closeups from its 35 mm lens. It's a film that says on multiple levels there's more to each scene than first meets the eye.

complete on-line article: